MEDICAL CHRONICLES|18|LESSONS FROM SCRUBBING IN

PREPARE AHEAD OF TIME FOR WHAT YOU WANT: If you’re a student aspiring to be picked for a particular role, prepare for it. Don’t casually run into opportunities. You can’t be fully prepared for some things and some opportunities indeed take you by surprise but to the extent that you can, prepare.
PRACTICAL EXAMPLES: A few times, I wondered into ORs without knowing what surgeries were about to be performed talk less of the techniques to be used. Imagine the doctor asking, “Do you know what we’d be doing today?” The day this happened to me, I felt quite ashamed; especially knowing I could have checked that out somewhere before time.
Subsequently, since I knew what surgeries were mostly being carried out, I tried to read up a little on the particular techniques to be used. I didn’t really do well keeping up with this but I feel it’d really go a long way in helping your practice.
I downloaded videos to my kindle and tried to watch them on the bus or still read up cases and procedures.
I tried to be intentional about my break periods: rest, eat light, journal/read up something.
Having an idea how to PROPERLY scrub in saved me not just embarrassment but also helped me not to miss the chance of assisting.
You miss or reduce your chance of any form of participation if you are clueless about what is going on.
I can go on and on about this but trust me. Revise something. Know your stuff.

PS. If you find out that you’re clueless and can’t do anything to change that, if it’s just embarrassment and won’t cost a life/license, don’t shrink back. Still put yourself out there, accept/acknowledge you DO NOT KNOW and learn

EVERY PATIENT IS UNIQUE; INDEPENDENT OF OTHERS WHEN YOU SCRUB IN.
You can NEVER say; Oh, because I scrubbed in thoroughly for patient A’s surgery 35minutes ago, I ‘d just do something quick and less for patient B. NEVER!!! Even if you have 10 surgeries in a day, the moment you step out of sterility, you’d carry out the process of scrubbing in again like you just bathe in mud!
Ok, not so intensely but you get? You do it over and over without getting tired; without slacking. You can’t take such chances when you’re handling patients that’d be opened up.
Sepsis is real. Very importantly, It can cost your patient a very torturous life, cost a life, even cost you your license. Stay meticulous!

KNOW WHAT YOU DID (DURING THE PROCESS OF SCRUBBING IN) ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO RECALL VIVIDLY AND TALK SOMEONE THROUGH IT.
The first time I scrubbed in(1/4)
, I was left guessing and that was very dangerous.
I said things blurred for me because they actually did. I was remembering things in parts. The apprehension I had that I could do something wrongly did not make it better for me.
I worked on that and took my subsequent scrub in procedures meticulously.
(For days after my first scrub in experience, I kept worrying about the patients. I wanted to ask the Dr. if they were ok. I was afraid that II might not have done something correctly hence, sepsis might have set in. It’s just a little paranoia. What kept my mind in order was the ability ti recall and go through what I had done).

KEEP LEARNING.
Even though I had scrubbed in a number of times now, whenever I saw doctors scrub in, I watched through the glass door. I realised that they were being very intentional but relaxed. They weren’t rushing through the process and trust me, it did take some time. I learned that it was very ok to spend some amount of time sterilising those hands and forearms.
I observed what strength they applied, what skill they used. Again, trust me when I say there’s a skill for almost everything; if not everything. Even the rotating of your body from your waist upwards while rinsing your forearm is important.

I’d leave us a step by step approach on scrubbing, “gloving” and “gowning” in the nerest future.

Hope you learned something today?

xx
Ruth.

You may also like

  • Thanks a lot for this! Recently, I have been thinking about that concept: being intentional after watching a video on YouTube. Its very true,we always have to be prepared in every situation and not just take tings for granted.

    • RuthsBlog

      True dear. True.